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African Journal of Business and Economic Research (AJBER)
Published Since: 2006
Publishing Discontinued: The journal is published regularly. It is indexed at EBSCO, J-Gate, CABELL, ABDC, ProQuest and SABINET and accredied by IBSS.
Publication Frequency: Triennially (Three times a year)

A lot has happened, both good and bad, in Africa in the last 12 months alone. On the sad note, four presidents/ heads of government have died whilst still holding office, Chinese investments in the continent have unravelled their dark side, Islamists have reared their ugly heads in both Mali and Nigeria, and protesters have been mowed down by police in South Africa. On a positive note however, the World Bank’s Doing Business report has identified one of the best reformers to be from the continent – i.e. Rwanda. What’s more? Ethiopia only recently made history by taking delivery of the coveted Boeing 787 “Dream liner” aircraft, well ahead of India and other global players – albeit only a few days before the country lost its leader.      On the death of presidents in office, it is worth mentioning that since 2008, this has happened only 13 times worldwide, but Africa holds a record of 10 out of these. The latest is the death, af............

I am honoured to be given the opportunity to write the guest editorial for this first issue of 2012 which corresponds with my assumption of office as the Editor-in-Chief for the African Journal of Business & Economic Research. I must say that filling these shoes is a gargantuan task as my predecessor has set a stage that would be rather difficult to ascend. I can only hope that considering that the editorial board, most of whom have been retained, AJBER can only move in two directions – upwards and forward. I would like to acknowledge the hard work of three people in bringing about a successful completion of this first issue of 2012. First, my gratitude goes out to Daphne Halkias, for playing a central role inidentifying papers from the Global Islamic Marketing conference with some fit with what our readership would like to see more of in AJBER. Daphne worked tirelessly in the initial vetting of papers, as well as in the prior reviews of the selected papers from the Globa............

The articles in this issue address business practices in 47 sub-Saharan African countries, female immigrant entrepreneurship in South Africa Post 1994, entrepreneurial export orientation, strategy, and performance of SMEs in Nigeria, causality between current account and budget deficits in Kenya, adoption of information and communication technology in Nigeria, business profiles of female immigrant entrepreneurs in Nigeria, and barriers to SMEs development in the manufacturing sector Tanzania. In the first article, Kabongo and Okpara examine the impact of legal origins on the regulations of start-up businesses in 47 sub-Saharan African (SSA) countries. Following the classification of SSA nations in English and French legal origin countries, the authors examine the extent to which the historical origins of countries play a determinant role in the ease of starting a new business enterprise, in terms of the number of procedures with which an entrepreneur must comply in order to sta............

I am delighted to present this issue of African Journal of Business and Economic Research (AJBER). This is the first issue of AJBER under a new Editor and Editorial Review Board. AJBER intends to maintain its current image as one of the leading academic journals in Africa. The Editorial Board is committed to taking the journal to a new level by building AJBER into an internationally ranked journal that rivals its peers in other parts of world. To achieve this goal, two important changes have been made. First, the journal’s masthead will show a new Editorial Board structure led by the Editor-in-Chief. The second set of changes relates to the Editorial Board. The Editorial Review Board team has been expanded to include internationally renowned scholars and management practitioners. The third set of changes relates to the publication of special issues. We will publish special issues edited or co-edited by leading scholars and practitioners in the field. The seven articles in............

We have argued earlier in this journal that private enterprise-driven economic growth provides a realistic promise for absolute poverty reduction in Africa through lowering the levels of real unemployment and strengthening individuals’ capacity to care for themselves and their families. Furthermore, businesses tend to generate revenues necessary for anti-poverty policies of governments. The challenge is how to design policies and strategies that induce pro-poor growth without de-motivating the more industrious segments of an African country and without dependence on donor assistance. This understanding has stimulated a renewed academic interest in the role of African governments in the development of the private sectors of their economies. During the last two decades most African nations have embraced economic liberalization as an effective policy instrument for stimulating private enterprise development. Liberalization is generally associated with the removal of all forms of go............

Challenges of Enterprise-Driven Economic Growth in Africa     John Kuada   There is a growing concern within the development research and policy communities today about the persistent sluggish economic growth in most African countries despite the general upturn in the world economy during the last two decades and the general reduction of poverty in most developing countries. The search for explanations for Africa’s poverty has stretched from considerations such as corruption, poor governance and institutional problems (Killick et al., 2001), to the limited attention to private enterprise development (Fafchamps et al., 2001). The African Union has recently estimated that corruption costs Africa 148 billion US dollars per year, thereby increasing the costs of business transactions in Africa by up to 20 per cent.  Similarly the World Bank estimates that corruption impedes growth rates by 0.5 per cent per year. There is also the problem of weak supply side of............


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